Entrees

Bone Broth

 

BONE BROTH is a fast growing trend. I’ve personally assisted MANY friends and family on getting bone broth started and incorporated into their diets! I couldn’t be prouder of each person who has embarked on this journey to heal their body, and heal their family. New to this idea? Here is an AMAZING article bullet pointing the top benefits of BROTHING (as I call it), check it out!

Bone Broth is really just homemade stock that you add Apple Cider Vinegar to so minerals and gelatin from the bones are more easily extracted. It’s a traditional food from MANY different cultures all over the world and like gold for the immune system. In our fast food movement, cultural traditions have been lost. This tradition has been resurrected thanks to many paleo bloggers, authors, nutritionists and health professionals. Yay for a new generation of bone brothing!

Here’s an amazing Bone Broth story:

My dear friend who I’ve known since childhood had a VERY sick 1 year old girl with GERD. She literally refused to eat, and if she tried anything she would gag and choke! She was strictly breastfeeding and getting skinny. Her Doctor had her on a host of medication which was costly and not seeming to help much. She needed a drastic change! After a desperate phone call from her, she made a drastic diet change, started offering bone broth to the little girl. Within ONE WEEK most symptoms were majorly improved and she was happily drinking broth even with veggies pureed in! A month later she was a new girl, weight back on her, eating normally and symptom free! I knew bone broth was amazing, but until witnessing this, I’ve never been MORE of a believer.

how i drink it

Some say Bone Broth is an acquired taste, however I’ve always found it amazingly delicious and much better tasting than just boxed chicken or beef broth/stock. I enjoy it almost daily in the mornings before breakfast or evenings after dinner with a little extra salt and lemon. It is especially beneficial when your stomach is upset from poor food choices (or sickness) for nourishment and a rapid healing. I also use it as the base for any soups or stews I make, as the cooking liquid for rice/quinoa, or braising liquid. When it’s on the stove cooking it’s convenient to grab a ladle and enjoy some or add a little to whatever you’re cooking for an instant flavor boost or snack. When I do the AIP (Autoimmune Protocol) diet to reset my system, I enjoy it for breakfast most mornings by putting a little on the stove and throwing in some leftover roast chicken, a veggie, avocado, kelp noodles or a little cilantro and lemon juice, delish! Pictured above.

How to make it

The two most popular and convenient broths are chicken or beef. Below is a brief description of how to make each. Feel free to google around on many different broth making methods and more information about benefits, reasons to drink and interesting combinations. The possibilities are endless!

 

chicken bone broth

First roast a chicken! After the meat is eaten or removed from the chicken carcass, place the entire carcass (leftover scraps of meat, skin, or cartilage are all ok) in a large stock pot and cover with water and 1/4 C of Apple Cider Vinegar. I use a very large pot and put in 2 carcasses, feel free to double if you’re a heavy user.

Note: it is recommended if you have a meat cleaver to crack the bones to expose the marrow and more minerals before placing in the water. Note #2- chicken feet are loaded with gelatin and give an even richer flavor to the broth. It is also recommended that you add these to the broth as well. I’m a wussy so I have a hard time doing this, but if you’re a strong person and not afraid of such things, GO FOR IT.

While the carcass is soaking in the water and ACV, chop up 1 onion, a few stalks of celery, and a few carrots and throw into the pot. Fill up the pot 3/4 of the way with more water and a couple teaspoons of salt, a little pepper and 2 bay leaves (spices are optional and interchangeable, you can add different herbs and extra pepper for a more pungent flavor).

Boil. Once boiling, any impurities will rise to the top and look foamy, skim these off with a wooden spoon then simmer, covered for 24 HOURS.

Strain, drink or freeze, then return JUST the carcass to the pot and repeat the above process for a second batch using the same carcass. This batch will be weaker broth, this is what I use for my soup bases and keep the stronger first batch for drinking alone.

 

beef BONE BROTH

Purchase beef bones from your local farmer or butcher, it is ideal if the bones are from grass fed cattle for the best nutrients. I typically use a combination of marrow bones and knuckle bones. Approximately 2 lbs of bones are sufficient for a batch. This for me means about 2 4″ marrow bones and 1 or 2 knuckle bones, or just 4 marrow bones. Roast the bones at 400 degrees for approx 20 mins till well browned and dripping.

Place roasted beef bones in a large stock pot and cover with water and 1/4 C of Apple Cider Vinegar. 

While the bones are soaking in the water and ACV, chop up 1 onion, a few stalks of celery, and a few carrots and throw into the pot. Fill up the pot 3/4 of the way with more water and a couple teaspoons of salt, a little pepper and 2 bay leaves (spices are optional and interchangeable, you can add different herbs and extra pepper for a more pungent flavor).

Boil. Once boiling, any impurities will rise to the top and look foamy, skim these off with a wooden spoon then simmer, covered for 48 HOURS.

Strain, drink or freeze, then return JUST the bones to the pot and repeat the above process for a second batch and then a third or fourth batch using the same bones. The third and fourth batches will be weaker broth, this is what I use for my soup bases and keep the stronger first two batches for drinking alone.

Note: beef bones are much more dense than chicken bones which is why you can get double the broth yield out of them.

Note #2: you can make bone broth in a crock pot! Put on high and skim as mentioned above, then turn to low and cover for the 24 or 48 hours – great choice for those that have gas ranges and don’t want to leave a flame burning overnight 🙂

happy bone brothing!!

Are you a regular bone broth-er already? Scared to attempt it? Leave your comments or success stories below!

 

 

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6 Comments

  • Reply
    Rick Lynn
    November 6, 2015 at 10:31 pm

    When you say, "then simmer and cover for 24/48 HOURS." Are you meaning to actually simmer for 24/48 hours, Or cover? I have a gas stove and I’m not sure I could comfortably leave the stove on while sleeping.

    • Reply
      Katie Mae Harrington
      November 7, 2015 at 6:20 am

      Yes! I do mean actually simmer for the whole period of time! Covered. You can make it in a crock pot on low if you don’t want to leave it on your stove!!

  • Reply
    Brittany
    November 7, 2015 at 4:55 am

    What would be the cooking directions if doing in a crock pot?

    • Reply
      Katie Mae Harrington
      November 7, 2015 at 6:21 am

      Everything exactly the same for a crock pot! Same amount of time, on the lowest setting 🙂

  • Reply
    Joanna
    September 11, 2018 at 6:34 am

    I truly enjoy drinking bone broth! It has reduced
    my rheumatoid arthritis and pain substantially. I used to be more sensitive to certain foods.

    I feel that the bone broth has improved my digestion in this area.
    It seems that I have more energy now that I’ve included bone broth into
    my diet. What do you think about mixing it with a curcumin capsule for more health benefits?

    • Reply
      katiemae
      September 12, 2018 at 6:13 am

      Hi Joanna! I have added turmeric many times to it and really like the taste.

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